Thursday, February 11, 2016

Quilled Moon and Star Tutorial

Quilling is an art form that uses paper stripes and a slotted tool that looks like a sewing needle with the end clipped off.

Recently I was paid a visit by With a Spin, who left me with her beautiful cookie cutters.  Since I'm an artist, I didn't even think of putting them in the kitchen and immediately I saw them as quilling walls to fill.

In the past, I've had to build my own walls to make letters or arabesque shapes. But here were walls that were reusable over and over to give me the same consistent shape.  I couldn't wait to try them out.

To the disappointment of my baking daughter, the cookie cutters came into the studio.

I hope you enjoy this cookie cutter tutorial and look around your house for new, unusual, walls to fill.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters Tutorial
Supplies
Paper crimping tool
Watercolor paper
White shadowbox frame
Scissors
Glue
Quilling tool
Two colors of 12 inch quilling stripes

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Start by making beehive quilling stripes.  Start a little bit down one end and fold the paper onto itself. Take your tool out, go down a bit more on the strip and do it again.

I made four and a half to fill the moon.  For the star, I used 3 stripes, but I precut them all in half stripes before I beehived quilled them. The six small stripes fit in much better then trying to fit in the longer stripes in the star. (You'll thank me for hours of your life back, trust me.)
Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Wiggle them in. It's a tight space. If you have tweezers or a toothpick, use them.
Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Place glue dots where your paper meets.
Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Run a strip through your crimping tool to make the paper corrigated.
Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Wiggle your quilled piece out of the cookie cutter. I placed one of the same color around it first and then a contrasting color over that.

Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Wait for everything to dry, peel off all the glue from your fingertips, then glue your shapes to your paper.
Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

I used watercolor paper and this blue color because I still hadn't cleaned up my workspace from our last art piece.

You can also use colored cardstock behind your shapes to make them stand out. Your next dilemma will be to decide on placement in the frame. Put them together? Place them apart?
Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

Of course, nothing can beat white background in a white frame. Always a classic.
Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab

For those that follow me on Instagram, you've already seen a sneak peek of playing around with different colors too.
Quilled Moon and Star with Cookie Cutters by A Crafty Arab
There are two more shapes in the cookie cutter set. I might actually take the left over green triangles from my last project (did I already mention the messy workspace?) and start playing around with architecture.

Stay tuned as cookie cutter quilling might show up again!

Tuesday, February 9, 2016

3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus

This post is written as part of Multicultural Kids Blog 3rd annual Black History Month series and giveaway.   Continue reading to learn about Marita, and then check out the links below on how you can win some fantastic prizes.
3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab

I volunteer teach art every two weeks in my daughter's 3rd grade class.

I am introducing them to the seven elements of art and we have learned about lines, primary colors and secondary colors. But today the art room where we usually work is being used for testing, so I used the opportunity to teach them about a new artist and have them collect supplies for next time.

In celebration of Black History Month, in our art lesson today I talked to them about local artist Marita Dingus.

3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab
I met Marita when we both went through training at the Seattle Art Museum in the early 90s to become African Art Interpreters. Since then, she and I have remained friends, shared many meals together and interacted at various art events.

Recently, I took my youngest daughter to her "The Girls" opening at Travor Gallery. Then last summer I took two of my children to her home for a summer party and they were blown away at all the artwork everywhere. And I do mean everywhere. Check my Instagram for a photo of them next to Big Sister.

Since our 3rd grade class had not completed the 3rd Grade Art Lesson: Contrast Colors in African Dancers from last time, I talked to them about Marita while they worked.

Marita Dingus was born in Seattle. Her first introduction to recycled art came as a child. Her father worked for Boeing and would bring home paperwork that was going to be thrown away. He saw that it was white and clean on the other side, ready for Marita to draw on. She was further encouraged to draw when a fight with her sister forced her to make her own paper dolls.

After high school, she went to on to study art at colleges in Philadelphia and San Jose before returning to live here full time. Her family had many college graduates, so her parents encouraged her to go and study her passion, making art, and to this day she continues to travel and study.  Her artwork has been in international shows and she has won impressive awards for her numerous accomplishments.

Marita's artwork is nothing like I've ever seen before. She makes moving sculpture from discarded pieces of life. She uses wire, fabric, inner tubes, bottles, glass, cork, and just about anything she can get her hands on (or friends give her!).

Her 400 Men and 200 Women of African Descent, which took her close to 2 years to create, consists of small headless figures, each one unique. She created them after visiting the Elmina Castle in Ghana, a holding area for African slaves to be transported to the Americas.

3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab


While Marita does use dolls, which evokes a playfulness in her work, it is an allusion that in reality associates with a much darker time in our history, the treatment of African Americans. She calls her material "discarded"

"I like “discarded” because I see a correlation with my ideology. The materials represent discarded people, and people of color historically have been used and discarded. You don’t discard people. They have value."

Her work is always growing but the core of it always lies in the ability she has of seeing the beauty in the castaways of society. She is a true master of the reinvention. Her piece Buddha as an African Slave, weaves the history of the slave ships with a 60-foot Buddha that she saw in Beijing.

3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab


I showed the children photos of her work and this video.
3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab


I told them to start collecting discarded objects at home so we can work on a project inspired by her for our next art lesson. I also told them to have their parents email me their baby photos to put in the middle.

Next time we were back in the art room, we are going to make our own embellished faces!

As I wrapped up talking about Marita, the kids finished their warm and cool pieces inspired by another fantastic African American artist we talked about last time, Augusta Asberry.

3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab

Here are a few of the masterpieces.

3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab

3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab

3rd Grade Art Lesson: Celebrating Black History Month with Marita Dingus by A Crafty Arab

Be sure to join us in two weeks!

xxx

Multicultural Kids Blog 3rd annual Black History Month series

For the month of February I am taking part in a blog hop with Multicultural Kids on Black History Month. Be sure to check out more posts from other bloggers below.

Welcome to our third annual Black History Month series and giveaway!  Check out the series from 2015 and 2014.

Follow along all month long as we explore the rich history and cultures of Africa and African-Americans. Be sure to enter our giveaway.  You can also follow our Black History board on Pinterest.
 
February 15 Mother in the Mix
February 22 Crafty Moms Share
February 26 LadyDeeLG
February 29 Hispanic Mama

Monday, February 8, 2016

The Reminder Series Interview

I enjoy my job as the Team Captain of the MuslimTeam on Etsy because I always get to meet new interesting people.  I love getting to know their products and promoting their work to the general public.
The Reminder Series Interview by A Crafty Arab

Today I have the honor of introducing you to a MuslimTeam on Etsy member that creates beautiful artwork in her home studio, Hafsa Khizer, who runs the shop, The Reminder Series.

The Reminder Series Interview by A Crafty Arab


Tell us a bit about yourself?
Talking about myself is rough, I'd rather do the tango with with an army of porcupines! What I'm really trying to say is, I'm passionate about showcasing what people are passionate about.

I'm a Graphic designer, creative photographer, and (dare I say) an Artist! I live in Calgary, Alberta, I can be goofier than necessary, and I need to be a better entrepreneur! Above all I'm passionate about art that moves people, and art that refreshes my connection with Allah. 'Creating' in a general sense has been a big part of my journey.

The Reminder Series Interview by A Crafty Arab

Apart from being ‘creative’ what do you do?
I feel like everything I do is creative in some sense or other, whether it's the fact that I love biking, practice acrobatic yoga, yell at people who don't recycle or hike in the glorious Canadian Rockies - with each experience i feel my mind expand and the opportunity to see things and people in a new light.

The Reminder Series Interview by A Crafty Arab

What inspires you to do the kind of work you do?
I feel like my most authentic self when I am focused on creative endeavors. I find great healing in art and that's precisely why I started The Reminder Series.

It was a creative outlet to help me cope with anxiety, the loss of loved ones in my life, and stay connected to the Quran. When I paint I listen to the tafseer of the Quran, recordings of the classes I took at Alhuda institute.  It 'reminds' me that I am not alone and Allah is always with me, He sustains the earth, all our beating hearts and everything underneath the soil. Its delightful when people share that my art brings dhikr and meaning to their homes as well.

The Reminder Series Interview by A Crafty Arab

Do you look up to anyone? Who? Why?
I find a teacher in everyone I meet!

The Reminder Series Interview by A Crafty Arab

What other passions do you have in your life?
I am passionate about healing! I am passionate about herbs, human connection and community. I am currently writing a book "When Tears Don't Dry" which is an extension of the Traumatic Stains Project.

The Reminder Series Interview by A Crafty Arab

How do you promote your work?
I have my own website and of course I sell on Etsy. I use Instagram and Facebook also.

The Reminder Series Interview by A Crafty Arab

To support more MuslimTeam on Etsy members, please read their interviews -
With A Spin Interview 
Haute Sugary Interview
JanLuc Designs Interview
Little Smiles Boutique Interview
Omees Boutique Interview
Designer Cottage Interview
Juliet Caeser Interview
QasiMadHandicrafts Interview
Katie Miranda Studios Interview
Knitella Interview
Firyuza Interview
My Islamic Life interview
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